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NASA, NOAA to Announce 2023 Global Temperatures, Climate Conditions


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This map depicts global temperature anomalies for meteorological summer in 2023 (June, July, and August). It shows how much warmer or cooler different regions of Earth were compared to the baseline average from 1951 to 1980.

Climate researchers from NASA and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) will release their annual assessments of global temperatures and discuss the major climate trends of 2023 during a media briefing at 11 a.m. EST Friday, Jan. 12.

NASA will stream audio of the briefing on the agency’s YouTube.

Participants will include:

  • Kate Calvin, chief scientist and senior climate advisor, NASA Headquarters
  • Gavin Schmidt, director, NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies
  • Sarah Kapnick, chief scientist, NOAA 
  • Russ Vose, chief, analysis and synthesis branch, NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information

Members of the media can access the briefing using the online registration.

NASA and NOAA are two keepers of the world’s temperature data and independently produce a record of Earth’s surface temperatures and changes based on historical observations over oceans and land.

For more information about NASA’s Earth science programs, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/earth

-end-

Karen Fox / Katherine Rohloff
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1600
karen.c.fox@nasa.gov / katherine.a.rohloff@nasa.gov

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Last Updated
Jan 08, 2024

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      Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala. 
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