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Argentina es el 28.º signatario de los Acuerdos de Artemis


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En una ceremonia celebrada la Casa Rosada de Buenos Aires el jueves 27 de julio, Argentina se convirtió en el vigésimo octavo país en firmar los Acuerdos de Artemis. El administrador de la NASA, Bill Nelson, participó en la ceremonia de firma por parte de la agencia, y el ministro de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación, Daniel Filmus, firmó por parte

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      Rachel Kraft
      Headquarters, Washington
      202-358-1100
      rachel.h.kraft@nasa.gov
      Madison Tuttle
      Kennedy Space Center, Florida
      321-298-5868
      madison.e.tuttle@nasa.gov
      Courtney Beasley
      Johnson Space Center, Houston
      281-483-5111
      courtney.m.beasley@nasa.gov
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      News Media Contact
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      Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
      256.544.0034
      corinne.m.beckinger@nasa.gov
      View the full article
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