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Divers encounter enormous ‘doomsday"' deep sea fish off the coast of Ruifang, Taiwan


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Divers off Taiwan were mesmerized after encountering a giant oarfish off the coast of Ruifang, Taiwan. 

oar%20fish%20taiwan.jpg

In the enchanting footage, divers can be seen encircling the shimmery silver critter as it hovers near the surface. At one point, one of the divers reaches out and touches the alleged doomsaying denizen of the deep. 

Remarkable, the oar fish had several round bite marks believed to have been caused by a shark. 

Diving instructor Wang Checng-Ru said that the oarfish must have been dying so it swam into shallower waters, however, locals believe this creature, which typically inhabit depths ranging from 656 to 3200 feet below the ocean's surface, is a harbinger of an impending earthquake or other misfortune.

 

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