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First data from Europe’s Lightning Imager


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First_data_from_Europe_s_Lightning_Image Video: 00:04:49

Discover the first results from Europe’s first Lightning Imager onboard the Meteosat Third Generation. The Lightning Imager can continuously detect rapid flashes of lighting in Earth’s atmosphere whether day or night from a distance of 36 000 km.

This is the first time a geostationary weather satellite has the capability to detect lightning across Europe, Africa and the surrounding waters. Each camera can capture up to 1000 images per second and will continuously observe lightning activity from space. The data will give weather forecasters greater confidence in their predictions of severe storms.

More information on the Lightning Imager first data

Access all the MTG Lighning Imager animations.

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