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Harvard scientist Avi Loeb claims 'Metallic Spheres' found on ocean floor may be alien tech


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The discovery of microscopic spherules by a team of scientists, including Harvard Professor Avi Loeb, during an expedition off the coast of Papua New Guinea has raised intriguing possibilities. 

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According to Professor Loeb, these iron sphere-shaped fragments could potentially be remnants of an extraterrestrial object, labeled "IM1, that exploded in Earth's lower atmosphere before falling into the Pacific Ocean nearly a decade ago. 

The spherules, weighing a total of 35 milligrams, were collected using a magnetic sled. Professor Loeb suggests that the unusual material strength and properties of the fragments make them distinct from space rocks previously studied by NASA. He speculates that the source of these spherules could be either a natural environment different from our solar system or an extraterrestrial technological civilization. 

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Avi Loeb, discusses their findings, saying the objects are being examined with the best instruments available. If future studies support the hypothesis that these spherules are indeed remnants of an extraterrestrial object, it would represent a significant discovery with profound implications for our understanding of the universe and the existence of extraterrestrial life.

 

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