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Ariane 6: mobile gantry removal test


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    • By European Space Agency
      Video: 00:07:30 Meet the people working on the testing of Ariane 6. Europe’s next rocket, Ariane 6, has passed all its qualification tests in preparation for its first flight, and now the full-scale test model will be removed from the launch pad to make way for the real rocket that will ascend to space.
      To make way for launch, teams from ArianeGroup, France’s space agency CNES and ESA have started to remove the Ariane 6 test model by disconnecting the cables and fuel lines that pass through the launch tower.
      Find out about the progress being made at the end of testing by the people who know Ariane 6 best. Featuring interviews with ESA’s launch system architect Pier Domenico Resta, CNES Inspector General Bernard Chemoul, CNES Ariane 6 project manager Olivier Bugnet, ESA Launch system engineer Frank Saingou, ArianeGroup system test program manager Valérie and ArianeGroup production engineering manager Lydia Amakoud.
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    • By NASA
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      News Media Contact
      Jenalane (Rowe) Strawn
      Marshall Space Flight Center
      Huntsville, Ala.
      256-544-0034
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    • By European Space Agency
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      For the full b-roll sets for launch campaign -> https://www.esa.int/esatv/Videos/2024/02/Ariane_6_inaugural_launch
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      Image: Ariane 6 ready for unloading View the full article
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