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Stories of Service: Like father, like son: Space Force Guardian follows father's footsteps


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As Senior Master Sgt. Anthony Chua placed his personal U.S. Space Force patch on his son's uniform, it was a moment of pride and humility for them both. Chua, a seasoned Airman and now Guardian, was witnessing his son follow in his footsteps. It was a moment of deep significance as the torch of service and sacrifice was passed down from one generation to the next.
U.S. Space Force Senior Master Sgt. Anthony Chua, 1st Delta Operations Squadron, Detachment 1 senior enlisted leader, center, prepares to place his U.S. Space Force patch on his son, U.S. Space Force Spc. 3 Anthony "AJ" Chua, during the Guardian Recognition and Patching Ceremony at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, April 25, 2023. AJ is following in his father's footsteps of serving in the Space Force, enlisting as a cyber operations specialist. (Courtesy photo)

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