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Montana Students to Hear from NASA Astronaut on Space Station


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Students from the Boys & Girls Club of the Flathead Reservation and Lake County in Ronan, Montana, will have an opportunity this week to hear from a NASA astronaut aboard the International Space Station. The space-to-Earth call will air live at 12 p.m. EST on Wednesday, Jan. 25, on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website.

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