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Burning meteor plunges to the ground in Jinhua, China


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This video, which was filmed yesterday (December 15), shows a meteorite illuminating the night sky and falling on the ground like a "fireball" in Jinhua, Zhejiang province. No injury was reported. 

meteor%20fireball%20china.jpg

The fireball seen from a dash cam video crossed the sky for just a few seconds and fell far away while burning, with a brightness that was brighter than a full moon. 

Some unburned meteorite fragments were found in Chengtou Village, Pujiang County, Jinhua. The meteorite found measured 8 centimeters in length and weighed 1.7 kilograms. 

It is understood that the meteor was too big to be burnt up at high altitude so it then entered the Earth's atmosphere, producing dazzling light. 

Zhang Baolin, a senior meteorite expert at the Beijing Planetarium and a science expert at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, said to the local media that the meteorite probably came from the asteroid belt between Jupiter and Mars. 

Zheng Yongchun, deputy director of the Space Science Communication Expert Studio and a science expert, made a preliminary judgment after seeing the meteorite fragment that the meteorite is 4.6 billion years old, older than all the rocks on Earth.

 

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