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    • By NASA
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      Brad Flick, center director at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, talks to students from California State University, Northridge, California. As part of the university’s Autonomy Research Center for science, technology, engineering, entrepreneurship, arts, humanities, and mathematics, the students displayed posters and answered questions about their technologies May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium on Edwards Air Force Base, California.NASA/Steve Freeman Students from a minority-serving university in California are helping solve challenges of autonomous systems for future drone operations on Earth and other planets. These students are making the most of opportunities with NASA, the U.S. Department of Defense, and industry, focusing on autopilot development and advanced systems that adapt and evolve.
      Students from California State University, Northridge, who are part of the university’s Autonomy Research Center, displayed and discussed their research with posters highlighting the technology they developed at a recent event at Edwards Air Force Base in Edwards, California. A Mars science helicopter, mini rovers for science exploration, and 3D printed sulfur concrete for Mars habitats are some of their projects, and they answered questions from experts in the field on May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium.
      Two men from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, ask Jared Carrillo, a student from the California State University, Northridge, Autonomy Research Center for science, technology, engineering, entrepreneurship, arts, humanities, and mathematics, about his work on the Mars Science Helicopter. Students displayed posters and answered questions about their technologies May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium on Edwards Air Force Base, California.NASA/Steve Freeman “The goal is to help minority-serving institutions develop relationships with NASA,” said Bruce Cogan, a NASA Armstrong Small Business Innovation Research program liaison for the agency’s Aeronautics Research and Mission Directorate. “We want students to make connections and learn how to use NASA processes to submit research proposals. Students could also supplement work in autonomy that NASA wants to pursue.”
      Representatives from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, attended the event, looking for potential collaborations with students where NASA Armstrong would provide the funding through sources such as the NASA Armstrong Center Innovation Fund and NASA’s Convergent Aeronautics Solutions project to advance technology.
      Six students from the California State University, Northridge, Autonomy Research Center for science, technology, engineering, entrepreneurship, arts, humanities, and mathematics spoke about their Trust in Autonomy technology. The students from left are Aniket Christi, Julia Spencer, Dana Bellinger, Zulma Lopez Rodriguez, front, Jordan Jannone, and Samuel Mercado. The group answered questions about their technology May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium on Edwards Air Force Base, California.NASA/Steve Freeman Use of uncrewed systems will require development of advanced controllers, and ideas like trust in autonomy, or how people can trust what the computers are doing, and human-machine teaming on Mars and Europa missions are examples of potential partnerships, Cogan said.
      Brad Flick, NASA Armstrong center director, and Tim Cacanindin, U.S. Air Force Global Power Bombers Combined Test Force deputy director, spoke at the event. Following the event, more than 50 students and faculty toured NASA Armstrong facilities.
      NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Project Institutional Research Opportunity funds a multi-year grant for the Autonomy Research Center. NASA Armstrong, and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, co-sponsored the NASA grant.
      Nhut Ho, director of the NASA-sponsored Autonomy Research Center for science, technology, engineering, entrepreneurship, arts, humanities, and mathematics at California State University, Northridge, left, spoke to Brad Flick, center director at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. The men were attending a student poster event, where students showcased their technologies and answered questions May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium on Edwards Air Force Base, California.NASA/Steve Freeman Share
      Details
      Last Updated Jun 10, 2024 EditorDede DiniusContactJay Levinejay.levine-1@nasa.govLocationArmstrong Flight Research Center Related Terms
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    • By NASA
      The National Weather Service in Huntsville hosted a visit by the NWS Office of Science and Technology Integration. OSTI is the main office within the NWS that manages and plans research to operations projects for the NWS and the integration of technology across NWS field offices. The visit by OSTI leadership and management started with discussions with NWS Huntsville and highlighted an afternoon session to learn more about SPoRT, R2O projects, and partnerships within the NWS. OSTI values the efforts of SPoRT in transitioning NASA research to NWS offices and plans to continue collaborative discussions and knowledge sharing on R2O/O2R and SPoRT products that have been successfully integrated into NWS operations.
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    • By NASA
      Patrick Duran and Anita LeRoy (ST11) met with Samir Belabbes from the United Nations Institute for Training and Research to investigate ways for SPoRT to provide NASA remote sensing products to the UN Satellite Centre. The new collaboration springs from a presentation given by Belabbes at last year’s Joint Applications Workshop of NASA’s CYGNSS and TROPICS missions, which was organized by Duran and Jason Dunion from the University of Miami. The UN Satellite Centre maintains a 24/7 operational forecasting and disaster response center that serves UN member states. The Centre has a need for remote sensing datasets that enhance their ability to anticipate and respond to disasters, and data from new NASA missions such as TROPICS could be particularly beneficial for monitoring high-impact events. A key takeaway from the discussion is that the UN and its member states will be much better able to use NASA data if it is provided in GeoTIFF format. SPoRT will investigate ways to provide data products from current and upcoming NASA missions in this format for dissemination to UN member states and use at the UN operational forecasting and response centers.
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    • By NASA
      Orlando Science Center brings STEM engagement to the community via a weekly after school series, culminating in an Engineering Design Challenge.Credits: Orlando Science Center NASA is awarding approximately $3.7 million to 17 museums, science centers, and other informal education institutions as part of an initiative to ignite STEM excitement. The money will go toward projects that inspire students and their learning support systems to take an active role in the wonder of science, technology, engineering, and math.  
      “We’re excited to grow the community of informal education organizations through these awards,” said Torry Johnson, deputy associate administrator of STEM Engagement Programs at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “These organizations bring the excitement of STEM and spaceflight to students where they are, helping us inspire the Artemis Generation of future explorers and innovators. These awards are a real catalyst for partnerships that connect STEM education and NASA’s missions to communities across the nation.”
      Projects were selected for NASA’s Teams Engaging Affiliated Museums and Informal Institutions (TEAM II) program and TEAM II Community Anchor Awards. Both are funded through NASA’s Next Generation STEM project, which supports kindergarten to grade 12 students, caregivers, and formal and informal educators in engaging the Artemis Generation in the agency’s missions and discoveries. The selected projects will particularly engage students from underserved communities in a variety of STEM learning opportunities including exhibits, mentorship, educational content, and hands-on activities.
      TEAM II Awards

      NASA’s vision for TEAM II is to enhance the capability of informal education institutions to host NASA-based learning activities while increasing the institutions’ capacity to bring NASA resources to students. The agency has selected four institutions to receive approximately $3.2 million in cooperative agreements for projects they will implement during the next three to four years.
      The selected institutions and their proposed projects are:
      Franklin Institute, Philadelphia: NASA’s Next Advocates: Connecting Youth to NASA Through a Co-Created Near-Peer Mentorship Program WEX Foundation, San Antonio: New Worlds Await You – Next Generation Astrobotic Foundation, Pittsburgh: Cosmic Careers from the Earth to the Moon EcoExploratorio, Inc., San Juan, Puerto Rico – Innovative Space Learning Activities Center: Living On and Beyond Earth Community Anchor Awards
      The designation as a Community Anchor recognizes institutions as locations that will bring NASA STEM and space science to students and families in traditionally underserved areas. The agency has selected 13 institutions to receive approximately $510,000 in grants to help make these one-to-two-year projects a reality, enhancing the local impact and strengthening their ability to build sustainable connections between their communities and NASA.
       
      The selected institutions and their proposed projects are:
      Exploration Works, Helena, Montana: Moon to Mars to Montana       Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, Vermont: Empowerment Through Climate Action      Intrepid Museum Foundation, Inc., New York: NASA Explore Days Discovery Place, Inc., Charlotte, North Carolina: NASA Community Space Stations The Discovery Museum, Bridgeport, Connecticut: Using Community Science to Engage Underrepresented Youth in Authentic STEM Engagement and Research Museum of Discovery and Science, Inc., Fort Lauderdale, Florida: Delivering NASA STEM Education Programs to Underserved Communities in Broward County GrowingGreat, Manhattan Beach, California: Food in Space and in the City: Teens Tackle Food Security in Their Los Angeles Community Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland: Expanding STEM/Astronomy Learning to Underserved Youth Communities Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum, McMinnville, Oregon: Spaced Out! Fostering STEM Literacy in Students Grades 5 to 8: Through Immersive Space Science Learning Experiences Ocean County College, Toms River, New Jersey: Family on Campus Using Science San Diego Air & Space Museum, San Diego: Imagine the Future of Space FL Newspaper in Educ Coordinator, Deerfield Beach, Florida: Increasing STEM Engagement Among Underserved Youth in Tampa Bay, Florida STEM Advancement, Inc., Pinola, Mississippi: Equipping and Inspiring Rural Students with Space‐Related Experience Next Gen STEM is a project within NASA’s Office of STEM Engagement, which develops unique resources and experiences to spark student interest in STEM and build a skilled and diverse next generation workforce.
      For the latest NASA STEM events, activities, and news, visit:
      https://stem.nasa.gov
      -end-
      Gerelle Dodson
      Headquarters, Washington
      202-358-4637
      gerelle.q.dodson@nasa.gov
      Share
      Details
      Last Updated Mar 28, 2024 LocationNASA Headquarters Related Terms
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    • By European Space Agency
      A small, shoebox-sized spacecraft delivered to ESA’s Hera mission this week promises to make a giant leap forward in planetary science. Once deployed from the Hera spacecraft at the Didymos binary asteroid system, the Juventas CubeSat perform the first radar probe within an asteroid, peering deep into the heart of the Great-Pyramid-sized Dimorphos moonlet.
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