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MTG-I1 never to be seen again


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Ariane 5 fairing ready to meet MTG-I1

As preparations to launch Europe’s first Meteosat Third Generation Imager satellite continue, the team at Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, has bid farewell to their precious satellite as it was sealed from view within the Ariane 5 rocket’s fairing. This all-new weather satellite is set to take to the skies on 13 December.

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      Details
      Last Updated Nov 07, 2023 Editor Jamie Adkins Location Goddard Space Flight Center Related Terms
      Asteroids Goddard Space Flight Center Lucy The Solar System Explore More
      3 min read NASA’s Lucy Spacecraft Captures its 1st Images of Asteroid Dinkinesh
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      Media Contacts

      Laura Betz – laura.e.betz@nasa.gov
      NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.


      Hannah Braun – hbraun@stsci.edu , Christine Pulliam – cpulliam@stsci.edi
      Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.

      Downloads
      Download full resolution images for this article from the Space Telescope Science Institute.


      Related Information

      Neutron Stars – https://universe.nasa.gov/stars/types/#otp_neutron_stars
      Universe/Stars Basics – https://universe.nasa.gov/stars/basics/
      Universe Basics – https://universe.nasa.gov/universe/basics/

      More Webb News – https://science.nasa.gov/mission/webb/latestnews/
      More Webb Images – https://science.nasa.gov/mission/webb/multimedia/images/
      Webb Mission Page – https://science.nasa.gov/mission/webb/

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