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Announcement of ESA's new class of astronauts


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Announcement_of_ESA_s_new_class_of_astro Video: 00:40:00

ESA’s new class of astronauts is announced on Wednesday, 23 November 2022 at the Grand Palais Éphémère (GPE) in Paris. The new class includes career astronauts, reserve astronauts as well as astronauts with a physical disability for a feasibility project.

Last year and for the first time since 2008, ESA launched a call for applications and it received more than 22 500 valid applications. Today, ESA now reveals which of these were successful.

Watch the other ESA Astronaut Class 2022 videos.

Access the related broadcast quality footage.

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      Media Contacts
      Laura Betz – laura.e.betz@nasa.gov, Rob Gutro – rob.gutro@nasa.gov
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