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Webb catches fiery hourglass as new star forms


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The NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope has revealed the once-hidden features of the protostar within the dark cloud L1527 with its Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam), providing insight into the formation of a new star. These blazing clouds within the Taurus star-forming region are only visible in infrared light, making it an ideal target for Webb.

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      Headquarters, Washington
      202-358-1600
      joshua.a.finch@nasa.gov
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      Last Updated Feb 26, 2024 LocationNASA Headquarters Related Terms
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      Media Contact:
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      claire.andreoli@nasa.gov
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      Download full resolution images for this article from the Space Telescope Science Institute.
      Media Contacts
      Rob Gutro – rob.gutro@nasa.gov
      NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
      Christine Pulliam – cpulliam@stsci.edu
      Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.
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      Last Updated Feb 22, 2024 Editor Marty McCoy Related Terms
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