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DAF authorizes pass for COVID booster by 1 Dec.


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As we enter cold and flu season, Airmen and Guardians are encouraged to get their COVID-19 vaccination booster as soon as possible The virus continues to pose a risk to the health and welfare of service members, civilian employees and families. Airmen and Guardians who receive the COVID-19 Bivalent Booster released in September are authorized a one-day special pass from their commander as long as the booster is administered by Dec. 1.
Department of the Air Force News

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