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Former Navy Pilot: "I witnessed a solid black cube inside a translucent sphere"


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Former Lt. U.S. Navy and F/A-18F pilot Ryan Graves was the first actives duty pilot to publicly disclose regular sightings of Unindentified Aerial Phenomenon (UAP) talks about his encounter with what he describes as a solid black cube inside a translucent sphere. 

pilot%20black%20cube%20translucent%20sphere.jpg

He states that despite the wind was over 120-140mph the object was completely stationary midair without moving a bit up and down, left or right as well as the object followed a so-called "racetrack" what means it was not flying a straight flight path but flew a random track where it made impossible maneuvers like a u turn without slowing down. 

After the F/A-18F got an upgraded radar system, the pilots saw these kinds of objects of unknown origin on a daily basis and not only Navy pilots, also commercial pilots have reported these extraordinary flying objects, like the pilot who captured a black cube at high altitude during a commercial flight, see second video below. 

We can speculate whether these objects without wings or visible propulsion are man-made or of extraterrestrial origin, the fact is that these objects with exceptional abilities exist and move through our skies for whatever reason.

 

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