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European Researchers' Night 2022


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European_Researchers_Night_2022_card_ful Video: 00:02:37

On Friday 30 September, ESRIN, our establishment in Italy, welcomed members of the public on site as part of European Researchers' Night.
Joining research centres throughout Europe, European Researchers' Night, promoted each year by the European Commission, is targeted at people of all ages who want to know more about science, research, and space exploration.

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