Jump to content

NASA Invites Media to Headquarters to Meet Commercial Crew Astronauts


NASA

Recommended Posts

  • Publishers

rssImage-281bdb65850cda06d24809ab1505ae44.jpeg

NASA will host an in-person media opportunity at 8:45 a.m. EDT Tuesday, June 7, at NASA Headquarters in Washington with the agency’s SpaceX Crew-2 astronauts to discuss their recent mission aboard the International Space Station to benefit life on Earth and further exploration.

View the full article

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Similar Topics

    • By NASA
      Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft docked to the Harmony module of the International Space Station on the company’s Orbital Flight Test-2 mission (Credits: NASA) NASA and Boeing will discuss Starliner’s mission and departure from the International Space Station as part of the agency’s Boeing Crew Flight Test in a pre-departure media teleconference at 12 p.m. EDT Tuesday, June 18.
      NASA, Boeing, and station management teams will evaluate mission requirements and weather conditions at available landing locations in the southwestern U.S. before committing to the spacecraft’s departure from the orbiting laboratory.
      Participants in the news conference include:
      Steve Stich, manager, NASA’s Commercial Crew Program Dana Weigel, manager, NASA’s International Space Station Program Mike Lammers, flight director, NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston Mark Nappi, vice president and program manager, Commercial Crew Program, Boeing Media interested in participating must contact the NASA Johnson newsroom no later than 10 a.m., June 18, at 281-483-5111 or jsccommu@mail.nasa.gov. To ask questions, media must dial into the teleconference no later than 15 minutes before the start of the event.
      Audio of the teleconference will stream live on NASA’s website at:
      https://nasa.gov/nasatv
      As part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams lifted off at 10:52 a.m., June 5, on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida on an end-to-end test of the Starliner system. The crew docked to the forward-facing port of the station’s Harmony module at 1:34 p.m., June 6.
      For NASA’s blog and more information about the mission, visit:
      https://www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew
      -end-
      Josh Finch / Jimi Russell / Claire O’Shea
      Headquarters, Washington
      202-358-1100
      joshua.a.finch@nasa.gov / james.j.russell@nasa.gov / claire.a.o’shea@nasa.gov
      Courtney Beasley / Leah Cheshier
      Johnson Space Center, Houston
      281-483-5111
      courtney.m.beasley@nasa.gov / leah.d.cheshier@nasa.gov
      View the full article
    • By NASA
      Representatives from NASA, FEMA, and the planetary defense community participate in the fifth Planetary Defense Interagency Tabletop Exercise on April 2 and 3, 2024, to discuss the nation’s ability to respond effectively to the threat of a potentially hazardous asteroid or comet.Credits: NASA/JHU-APL/Ed Whitman NASA will host a virtual media briefing at 3:30 p.m. EDT, Thursday, June 20, to discuss a new summary of a recent tabletop exercise to simulate national and international responses to a hypothetical asteroid impact threat.
      The fifth biennial Planetary Defense Interagency Tabletop Exercise was held April 2 and 3, 2024, at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland.
      NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office, in partnership with FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) and with the assistance of the U.S. Department of State Office of Space Affairs, convened the tabletop exercise to inform and assess our ability as a nation to respond effectively to the threat of a potentially hazardous asteroid or comet. This exercise supports NASA’s planetary defense strategy to protect our planet and continues the agency’s mission to innovate for the benefit of humanity.
      Video of the briefing will stream live on NASA TV and NASA’s YouTube channel.
      The following participants will review the history and purpose of the exercise, the scenario encountered during this year’s simulation, and its findings and recommendations:
      Lindley Johnson, NASA’s Planetary Defense Officer Emeritus, NASA Headquarters, Washington Leviticus “L.A.” Lewis, FEMA detailee to NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office, NASA Headquarters Terik Daly, planetary defense section supervisor, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland To register for the briefing, media must RSVP no later than two hours before the event to Alise Fisher at alise.m.fisher@nasa.gov. NASA’s media accreditation policy is available online.
      While there are no known significant asteroid impact threats for the foreseeable future, hypothetical exercises like this one, which are conducted about every two years, provide valuable insights on how the United States could respond effectively if a potential asteroid impact threat is identified.
      This year’s exercise was the first to include participation by NASA’s international collaborators in planetary defense and the first to have the benefit of actual data from NASA’s successful DART (Double Asteroid Redirection Test) mission, the world’s first in-space technology demonstration for defending Earth against potential asteroid impacts.
      NASA established the Planetary Defense Coordination Office in 2016 to manage the agency’s ongoing efforts in planetary defense.
      To learn more about planetary defense at NASA, visit: 
      https://science.nasa.gov/planetary-defense/
      -end-
      Charles Blue / Karen Fox
      Headquarters, Washington 
      202-802-5345 / 202-358-1600
      charles.e.blue@nasa.gov / karen.fox@nasa.gov
      Share
      Details
      Last Updated Jun 14, 2024 LocationNASA Headquarters Related Terms
      Planetary Defense Coordination Office Planetary Defense Planetary Science Division Science & Research Science Mission Directorate View the full article
    • By NASA
      Michael Chandler has provided configuration and data management support at Houston’s Johnson Space Center for the last 13 years. After roughly seven years supporting the Exploration Systems Development Division, Chandler transitioned to the Moon to Mars Program Office in 2019. He and his team work to ensure that the baseline for Moon to Mars products, like agreements and documents, is appropriately controlled and that configuration and data management processes are integrated across the office’s six programs – Orion, Gateway, EHP, Space Launch System, Human Landing system, and Exploration Ground Systems.

      “The most rewarding part of my job is not only the magnitude of what I have the privilege of working on every day, returning humans to the surface of the Moon, but also the experience I get in working with such a diverse group of members of the aerospace community,” said Chandler, a contractor with The Aerospace Corporation. “It’s also so rewarding to work as a team on a common goal and to look forward to the work I do every day!”

      Portrait of Michael Chandler onsite at Johnson Space Center. NASA/Noah Moran Chandler has been an active member of the Out & Allied Employee Resource Group (OAERG) since 2018 and says his involvement with the group led to some groundbreaking life events. “I was very shy and reticent about revealing who I was until I got involved with Out & Allied,” he said. “I now believe that being ‘out’ is a way to support and encourage others to be themselves.”

      Chandler learned about OAERG while attending a training about how to be an ally for the LGBTQ+ community. In his first year with the group, he helped organize a panel discussion on allyship and creating safe workplaces. He then became co-chair of OAERG’s Pride Committee, working with ERG colleagues and others to plan the group’s LGBTQ+ Pride Month events and participation in Houston’s annual Pride Parade. “I had a wonderful experience managing events and bringing everyone together for Pride,” he said – efforts that earned him a Trailblazer Award.

      Chandler said he has grown personally and professionally through his involvement with OAERG. “I was very shy and kind of uptight at the first meeting that I went to, but everyone was so kind and accepting, and I slowly started taking on responsibilities and planning events,” he said. “These activities helped me grow as a communicator and a leader in my regular work and personal life.”

      Michael Chandler (left) stands with fellow Out & Allied Employee Resource Group members, waiting for the Houston Pride Parade to begin. Image courtesy of Michael Chandler Chandler belongs to other employee resource groups (ERGs) at Johnson to support different communities and find opportunities to collaboratively promote diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) at the center, and he encourages others to do the same. “Even if you only participate when you have time, it can lead to knowledge and ways to support other communities that have the same challenges in this world,” he said.

      Chandler has been impressed with agency and center leadership’s involvement in DEI efforts and support for ERGs to date. He suggested that increased communication around DEI initiatives may help to quell anxieties about the political landscape and developments outside of NASA by reassuring team members that their employer supports them for who they are. He believes that every person at Johnson can help create an inclusive environment by being respectful, listening with an open heart, and joining the fight to ensure that everyone can be themselves.

      “The most important thing is that everyone needs to be their true self,” he said. “It’s so rewarding and makes life so much more fun!”
      View the full article
    • By NASA
      NASA’s Pegasus barge delivers the SLS (Space Launch System) rocket’s core stage for the 2022 Artemis I mission to the turn basin at Kennedy Space Center in Florida in April 2021. Credits: NASA/Michael Downs Media are invited in late July to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to see progress on the agency’s SLS (Space Launch System) Moon rocket as preparations continue for the Artemis II test flight around the Moon.
      Participants joining the multi-day events will see the arrival and unloading of the 212-foot-tall SLS core stage at the center’s turn basin before it is transported to the nearby Vehicle Assembly Building. The stage will arrive on NASA’s Pegasus barge from the agency’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where it was manufactured and assembled.
      Media also will see the twin pair of solid rocket boosters inside the Rotation, Processing, and Surge Facility at the spaceport, where NASA’s Exploration Ground Systems Program is processing the motor segments in preparation for rocket assembly. NASA and industry subject matter experts will be available to answer questions. At launch, the SLS rocket’s two solid rocket boosters and four RS-25 engines, located at the base of its core stage, will produce 8.8 million pounds of thrust to send the first crewed mission of the Artemis campaign around the Moon.
      Media interested in participating must apply for credentials at:
      https://media.ksc.nasa.gov
      To receive credentials, international media must apply by Friday, June 28, and U.S. citizens must apply by Thursday, July 5.
      Credentialed media will receive a confirmation email upon approval, along with additional information about the specific date for the activities when they are finalized. NASA’s media accreditation policy is available online. For questions about accreditation, please email ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov. For other questions, please contact Kennedy’s newsroom at: 321-867-2468.
      Para obtener información sobre cobertura en español en el Centro Espacial Kennedy o si desea solicitar entrevistas en español, comuníquese con Antonia Jaramillo o Messod Bendayan a: antonia.jaramillobotero@nasa.gov o messod.c.bendayan@nasa.gov.
      The approximately 10-day Artemis II flight will test NASA’s SLS rocket, Orion spacecraft, and ground systems for the first time with astronauts and will pave the way for lunar surface missions, including landing the first woman, first person of color, and first international partner astronaut on the Moon.
      Learn more about Artemis at:
      www.nasa.gov/artemis/
      -end-
      Rachel Kraft 
      Headquarters, Washington 
      281-358-1100  
      rachel.h.kraft@nasa.gov  
      Tiffany Fairley/Antonia Jaramillo
      Kennedy Space Center, Florida
      321-867-2468
      tiffany.l.fairley@nasa.gov/antonia.jaramillobotero@nasa.gov
      Share
      Details
      Last Updated Jun 14, 2024 LocationNASA Headquarters Related Terms
      Artemis 2 Artemis Humans in Space Kennedy Space Center Space Launch System (SLS) View the full article
    • By NASA
      Although surrounded by the big and bold missions of human spaceflight, Margaret Kennedy, an aerospace systems engineer on the Human Health and Performance Contract, still appreciates the little things. Ask about her favorite NASA experience to date and she will tell you it is getting to show her badge to the gate guards at Houston’s Johnson Space Center every day. “Knowing I get to be a part of things that can change the world – that I’m helping to make it possible for astronauts to do their job safely, which in turn supports life on Earth – is very rewarding,” she said.

      Margaret Kennedy poses with Johnson Space Center’s inflatable mascot, Cosmo, at Comicpalooza 2024 in Houston, Texas. Image courtesy of Margaret Kennedy Kennedy joined the Johnson team as a contractor with Aegis Aerospace in October 2019. Since then, she has spent most of her time as a systems engineer for the Human Research Program’s Program Integration and Strategic Planning group. That role required her to collect technical information for various projects and to ensure systems were in place to correctly track and manage program documents and agreements. This spring, Kennedy transitioned to a new role in which she provides systems engineering for flight hardware supporting Gateway and exploration missions to the Moon and Mars.

      She started engaging with Johnson’s Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) shortly before the COVID-19 pandemic and jumped at the chance to get more involved once employees came back onsite. “A few people have been surprised when I tell them I’m really an introvert, not an extrovert, but I had to get out of my shell or I’d still be stuck in my apartment,” she said. “The ERGs were a way for me get out of my space and have allowed me to grow.”

      Kennedy is thankful the Johnson Parenting ERG started allowing contractors to serve as secretaries because that led to similar opportunities with other ERGs. She served as the membership secretary for both Emerge and Out & Allied ERG (OAERG) in 2023 and is currently OAERG’s executive secretary. “I help keep our chair and co-chair up to date,” she said. “I have my finger on everything that’s happening in the ERG.” Filling these roles gives Kennedy numerous opportunities to support diversity, equity, and inclusion at Johnson, the most recent of which was her participation on a panel during the center’s Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility Day.  

      Margaret Kennedy (left) participates in a panel discussion during Johnson Space Center’s 2024 Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Accessibility Day with Kent Kalogera, Out & Allied ERG chair, Livette Santiago Cardona, Greening and Restoring Our World ERG chair, Andrea Browne, African American ERG chair, and Anika Isaac, Employee Assistance Program counselor.NASA/Robert Markowitz “The main advice I’d give to others wanting to get involved is find your people and don’t be afraid to take a risk,” she said. “Many of us deal with risk every day in our work so find a way to buy down risk by finding allies and a support system. Even if you only get a hair’s width outside your zone of comfort, it makes a difference.”

      She also said that simply participating in ERG meetings and events – whether in person or virtually – is another great way to get involved. “The ERGs can’t do what we do without you,” she said. “We do it because it’s important to us and to others, but we sometimes struggle to know what people want. We need your thoughts and your ideas because it helps us provide programming and inform the center about what is happening.”

      Being a part of OAERG in particular has helped Kennedy personally and professionally. “It has provided me with a space to be my authentic self and bring that person to both the world and work,” she said. “In the long line of LGBTQI+ letter soup, I end up in the + on the end more times than not. Out & Allied has given me a way to not only embrace my identity but also help spread awareness about it.” Professionally, the ERG has helped her network with a range of people, including upper and middle management, and strengthen her communication, problem solving, and leadership skills.

      Margaret Kennedy (center) volunteering at a Hatch Youth event in Houston, Texas, with Kent Kalogera, Out & Allied ERG chair, and Chasity Williams, the group’s former chair. Image courtesy of Margaret Kennedy Kennedy acknowledged that change can take time, noting that while Johnson’s safety-oriented culture is a strength, it can sometimes slow the pace of initiatives that may not be considered mission critical, as can staffing shortages in some areas. “Things like accessible walkways and gender-neutral bathrooms are still important,” she said, adding that leadership is working on it.
      Kennedy encourages everyone at Johnson to check in with their teammates and have “water cooler moments” with their colleagues as a way of promoting inclusivity. “Be patient and willing to give everyone some grace,” she said. “We can get so focused on the mission and what we need that we sometimes forget there are things happening in other people’s lives that can affect their work.”
      View the full article
  • Check out these Videos

×
×
  • Create New...