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High speed UFO Fastwalker filmed from drone


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A drone owner filmed in the port of San Clemente del Tuyú, Province of Buenos Aires, Argentina a so-called high speed UFO Fastwalker. 

ufo%20fastwalker.jpg

If we zoom in we see that the Fastwalker, which has no wings or visible propulsion, looks like something made up of a construction of tubes attached to the main body.

 

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