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Colorado Students to Hear from Astronauts Aboard Space Station


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      Brad Flick, center director at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, talks to students from California State University, Northridge, California. As part of the university’s Autonomy Research Center for science, technology, engineering, entrepreneurship, arts, humanities, and mathematics, the students displayed posters and answered questions about their technologies May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium on Edwards Air Force Base, California.NASA/Steve Freeman Students from a minority-serving university in California are helping solve challenges of autonomous systems for future drone operations on Earth and other planets. These students are making the most of opportunities with NASA, the U.S. Department of Defense, and industry, focusing on autopilot development and advanced systems that adapt and evolve.
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      Last Updated Jun 10, 2024 EditorDede DiniusContactJay Levinejay.levine-1@nasa.govLocationArmstrong Flight Research Center Related Terms
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      Karen Fox
      Headquarters, Washington
      202-358-1600
      karen.fox@nasa.gov
      Sarah Frazier
      NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center
      202-853-7191
      sarah.frazier@nasa.gov
      Share
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      Last Updated Jun 11, 2024 LocationNASA Headquarters Related Terms
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      NASA astronaut pictured completing an installation outside of the International Space Station.Credits: NASA NASA will provide live coverage, beginning at 6:30 a.m. EDT Thursday, June 13, as two astronauts conduct a spacewalk outside of the International Space Station. The spacewalk is scheduled to begin at 8 a.m. and last about six and a half hours.

      NASA will stream the spacewalk on NASA+, NASA Television, the NASA app, YouTube, and the agency’s website. Learn how to stream NASA TV through a variety of platforms including social media.

      NASA astronauts Tracy C. Dyson and Matt Dominick will exit the station’s Quest airlock to complete the removal of a faulty electronics box, called a radio frequency group, from a communications antenna on the starboard truss of the space station. The pair also will collect samples for analysis to understand the ability of microorganisms to survive and reproduce on the exterior of the orbiting laboratory.

      Dyson will serve as spacewalk crew member 1 and will wear a suit with red stripes. Dominick will serve as spacewalk crew member 2 and will wear an unmarked suit. U.S. spacewalk 90 will be the fourth for Dyson and the first for Dominick in support of the space station.

      Following the completion of the spacewalk, NASA will announce participating crew members for U.S. spacewalks 91 and 92, scheduled for Monday, June 24 and Tuesday, July 2, and will provide additional coverage details.

      Get breaking news, images, and features from the space station on the station blog, Instagram, Facebook, and X.

      Learn more about International Space Station research and operations at:
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      Josh Finch / Claire O’Shea
      Headquarters, Washington
      202-358-1100
      joshua.a.finch@nasa.gov / claire.a.o’shea@nasa.gov
      Leah Cheshier / Anna Schneider
      Johnson Space Center, Houston
      281-483-5111
      leah.d.cheshier@nasa.gov / anna.c.schneider@nasa.gov
      Share
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      Last Updated Jun 10, 2024 LocationNASA Headquarters Related Terms
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