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Possible ancient doorway cut into a slope on Mars


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The photographs analyzed here was taken by Mast Camera (Mastcam) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 3466 (2022-05-07 07:58:16 UTC) and Mast Camera (Mastcam) onboard NASA's Mars rover Curiosity on Sol 3466 (2022-05-07 07:59:02 UTC). 

doorway%20mars%20(1).jpg

The anomalies featured here look like typical entranceways cut into a rockface or slope you would find here on Earth, e.g. in Egypt. 

In the one it looks like there is a ramp leading up to and into the entranceway, there seems to be a perfect straight edge frame and possibly cracked plaster on the inside wall. 

I speculate the first anomaly to be a couple of meters tall. There also seems to be an object to the bottom right of the opening which may have covered the opening. 

doorway%20mars%20(2).jpg

In the second anomaly we see similar right angles and straight edges (One side seems to reveal a wall or slab of uniform thickness as well as a peculiar dark like running diagonally across the opening).

 

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