Jump to content

DAF celebrates Military Spouse Appreciation Day


Recommended Posts

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Similar Topics

    • By NASA
      1 min read
      Preparations for Next Moonwalk Simulations Underway (and Underwater)
      Donna Davis, Telescience Support Center (TSC) data manager, seated left, explains how staff monitor International Space Station experiments in the Telescience Support Center. Credit: NASA/Jef Janis  Research shows that STEM education is important to middle school students because it helps them develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. It is also crucial for preparing students for their future careers.  
      NASA Glenn Research Center’s Office of STEM Engagement invited middle school students from several area schools to TECH Day at NASA Glenn in Cleveland on May 16. The event is designed to inspire middle school students’ interest in STEM fields. 
      Dr. Rickey Shyne, NASA Glenn’s director of Research and Engineering, welcomed students to the center. They then enjoyed tours of Glenn facilities, a student engineering design challenge, and discussions on different careers they can explore.  
      NASA Glenn Research Center’s Abigail Rodriguez, right, helps students conduct a hands-on activity related to the Orion spacecraft. Credit: NASA/Jef Janis  Return to Newsletter Explore More
      1 min read NASA Glenn Visits Duluth for Air and Aviation Expo, STEAM Festival  
      Article 9 mins ago 2 min read NASA Glenn’s Yvette Harris Inducted into MBA Hall of Fame 
      Article 9 mins ago 1 min read NASA Glenn Joins COSI’s Big Science Celebration
      Article 3 weeks ago View the full article
    • By European Space Agency
      View the full article
    • By European Space Agency
      View the full article
    • By NASA
      3 min read
      Preparations for Next Moonwalk Simulations Underway (and Underwater)
      Credit: NASA/Ryan Fitzgibbons What do you give to an ocean that has everything? This year, for National Ocean Month, NASA’s Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) satellite— is gifting us a unique look at our home planet. The visualizations created with data from the satellite, which launched on Feb. 8, are already enhancing the ways that we view our seas and skies. 
      The PACE satellite views our entire planet every day, returning data at a cadence that allows scientists to track and monitor the rapidly changing atmosphere and ocean, including cloud formation, aerosol movement, and differences in microscopic ocean life over time.
      The visualization starts with a view of swaths of Earth from PACE’s Ocean Color Instrument. The Ocean Color Instrument observes Earth in ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared light — over 200 wavelengths. With this level of detail, scientists can now, from space, regularly identify specific communities of phytoplankton — tiny organisms floating near the surface of the ocean that serve as the center of the marine food web. This is a major advance, as different types of phytoplankton play different roles in ocean ecosystems and health.
      PACE orbits Earth in this visualization, exposing a swath of true color imagery. NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio Zooming in, the visualization shows the ecosystems and surrounding atmosphere off the United States’ East Coast and The Bahamas on March 21. Like previous satellites, the Ocean Color Instrument can detect chlorophyll in the ocean, which indicates the presence and abundance of phytoplankton. The Ocean Color Instrument adds to this by allowing scientists to determine the types of phytoplankton present, such as the three different types of phytoplankton identified in the visualization.
      False color data visualization of phytoplankton (Picoeukaryotes and Prochlorococcus), as observed by PACE’s Ocean Color instrument (OCI).NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio The portion of the swirls in green indicate the presence of picoeukaryotes, organisms which are smaller than 0.3 micrometers in size — 30 times smaller than the width of a human hair. In light blue are prochlorococcus, the smallest known organism to turn sunlight into energy (photosynthesis); they account for a major fraction of all photosynthesis that occurs in the ocean. The portion of the bloom in bright pink indicates synechococcus, a phytoplankton group that can color the water light pink when many are present in a small area.
      False color data visualization of phytoplankton (Picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus), as observed by PACE’s OCI instrument. NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio These are just three of the thousands of types of phytoplankton, and just the start of what the Ocean Color Instrument will be able to identify.
      The PACE satellite’s two polarimeters, Hyper-Angular Rainbow Polarimeter #2 (HARP2) and Spectro-polarimeter for Planetary Exploration one (SPEXone), provide a unique view of Earth’s atmosphere, helping scientists learn more about clouds and small particles called aerosols. The polarimeters measure light that reflects off of these particles. By learning more about the interactions between clouds and aerosols, these data will ultimately help make climate models more accurate. Additionally, aerosols can degrade air quality, so monitoring their properties and movement is important for human health.
      Aerosols, as observed by PACE’s HARP2 and SPEXone instruments.NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio In the visualization, the large swath of HARP2 data shows the concentration of aerosols in the air for that particular day. These data — a measure of the light scattering and absorbing properties of aerosols — help scientists not only locate the aerosols, but identify the type. Near the coast, the aerosols are most likely smoke from fires in the U.S. southeast. Adding detail to the visualization and the science, the thin swath of SPEXone data furthers the information by showing the aerosol particle size.
      Over the next year, PACE scientists aim to create the first global maps of phytoplankton communities and glean new insights into how fisheries and aquatic resources are responding to Earth’s changing climate.
      To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video
      NASA’s Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) spacecraft was specifically designed to study the invisible universe of Earth’s sea and sky from the vantage point of space. We’ve measured 4-6 colors of the rainbow for decades, which has enabled us to “see” phytoplankton from space through the lens of its primary photosynthetic pigment, chlorophyll-a. PACE’s primary instrument is the first of its kind to measure all the colors of the rainbow, every day, everywhere. That means we can identify the type of phytoplankton behind the chlorophyll-a. Different types of phytoplankton have different effects on the food web, on water management, and on the climate, via their impact on the carbon cycle.NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio By Erica McNamee
      NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
      Share
      Details
      Last Updated Jun 07, 2024 EditorKate D. RamsayerContactErica McNameeerica.s.mcnamee@nasa.govLocationGoddard Space Flight Center Related Terms
      Earth Aerosols Goddard Space Flight Center Oceans PACE (Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, Ocean Ecosystem) Explore More
      4 min read NASA’s PACE Data on Ocean, Atmosphere, Climate Now Available
      Article 2 months ago 5 min read Early Adopters of NASA’s PACE Data to Study Air Quality, Ocean Health
      From the atmosphere down to the surface of the ocean, data from NASA’s PACE (Plankton,…
      Article 2 months ago 6 min read NASA’s PACE To Investigate Oceans, Atmosphere in Changing Climate
      Earth’s oceans and atmosphere are changing as the planet warms. Some ocean waters become greener…
      Article 5 months ago View the full article
    • By European Space Agency
      View the full article
  • Check out these Videos

×
×
  • Create New...