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ESA’s Space Environment Report 2022


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Since 2016, ESA’s Space Debris Office has published an annual Space Environment Report to provide a transparent overview of global space activities and determine how well these and other international debris-reduction measures are improving the long-term sustainability of spaceflight.

Here are some of the key findings of the 2022 report.

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      Josh Finch / Claire O’Shea
      Headquarters, Washington
      202-358-1100
      joshua.a.finch@nasa.gov / claire.a.o’shea@nasa.gov
      Sandra Jones / Anna Schneider
      Johnson Space Center, Houston
      281-483-5111
      sandra.p.jones@nasa.gov / anna.c.schneider@nasa.gov
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