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Similar unknown objects captured over South Africa and California


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On April 15, 2022 the Muizenberg live camera, Cape Town, South Africa captured an unknown object fly across the screen at 6.42 am. 

ufo%20California%20South%20Africa.jpg

Remarkable, two weeks earlier a Ring camera at Southwest Bakersfield, California captured a similar object moving strangely through the sky. 

It is not known whether these objects were meteorites, space junk or UFOs, but it remains strange that similar events have taken place in two different parts of the world.

 

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