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Impressive activity around and above the Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico


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The last days there is a lot of activity in space and above the volcano, probably meteors and other unknown objects caught by the cameras of webcamsdemexico. 

objects%20volcano.png

One of the objects/meteors explodes just above the volcano or did it impacts the volcano, you can see the precise moment when it impacts/explodes.

 

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