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Euclid spacecraft grows as eyes meet brain


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Euclid_spacecraft_grows_as_eyes_meet_bra Video: 00:04:06

On 24 March, over a dozen engineers gathered at Euclid’s industrial prime contractor, Thales Alenia Space in Turin, to carefully attach the two main parts of the Euclid spacecraft together. This task required such extreme precision that it took a whole day, followed by two days of connecting electronic equipment and testing that Euclid’s instruments still work.

Euclid is ESA’s mission to unveil the mysteries of the dark Universe.

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