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Gigantic Blue Jet filmed from airliner flight deck at 40.000 Feet


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An upper atmospheric lightning, called a blue jet, was recorded on November 19th, 2021 at 40 000 feet (12.000 meters) from an airliner flight deck. 

sky%2Bphenomenon%2Bblue%2Bjet%2Bstorm.jpg

The storm was located over the Bay on Bengal off the north Tamil Nadu coast in India. 

These gigantic blue jets known as Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) are rare weather phenomena that occur above thunderstorms but till now science does not yet have an explanation where in the cloud this rare phenomenon originate. 

Maybe it's not an electrical phenomenon that occurs over thunderstorms at all, but a secret space weapon? 

 

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