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Missing 411: This Navajo Park Ranger Reveals The Truth About What's Happening To People Inside These Parks


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This Navajo park ranger reveals the truth about what's happening to people inside these parks. Today, we take a look at what this Navajo park ranger said about working inside this park. 

missing%2B411%2Bnational%2Bparks.jpg

The police do incredible work, and they are usually the first ones on the scene when something goes wrong. Every so often though they will encounter something that even they can't explain. 

One of the places where officers are seeing strange things is that of the Navajo Reservation of the American southwest. This location is known for mysterious and legendary stories and the police here have encountered some strange things. 

One of the issues though is when police report these types of encounters, they can be mocked and locked down on. The police at Navajo Reservation however have a different view on things. They take these sightings and encounters seriously and will try to look into and understand each report. 

Today, we take a look at this compilation of interesting discoveries and announcements.

 

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