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UFO comes down from sky caught on CCTV cam in Peoria, Arizona


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CCTV camera in Peoria, Arizona captures a high speed UFO which comes down from the sky, fly approximately 200 feet above the ground, almost stops mid-air, makes a 90 degrees turn, then shoots straight up into the sky out of view. 

ufo%2Bsky%2Bphenomenon%2Barizona.jpg

The owner of the CCTV camera captured the strange event on October 16, 2021 and reported it to www.mufon.com

 

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      Last Updated Jul 01, 2024 Editor Lonnie Shekhtman Contact Lonnie Shekhtman lonnie.shekhtman@nasa.gov Location NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Related Terms
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