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Launching soon: Cosmic Kiss


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Launching_soon_Cosmic_Kiss_card_full.jpg Video: 00:04:00

German ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer will soon begin his first mission to the International Space Station. As a member of Crew-3, he will be launched from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft alongside NASA astronauts Raja Chari, Tom Marshburn and Kayla Barron.

Matthias selected the mission name “Cosmic Kiss” for his time in orbit as a declaration of love for space. He will spend around six months living and working in microgravity, where he will carry out many European and international experiments to advance space exploration and benefit lives on Earth.

For more on Matthias and the Cosmic Kiss mission visit the ESA mission website

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      Last Updated Jun 14, 2024 Editor Andrea Gianopoulos Location NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Related Terms
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