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Inside The Real Area 51: Former CIA Specialist Reveals Secrets


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Chrissy Newton sits down with Area51 insider and former CIA specialist, who reveals secrets about the base. 

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For some, Area51 has been an obsession for over 50 years. Talk of secret government technologies, off plant vehicles, back engineering, ET technology and so many more theories. Located in a remote desert, Area 51 is the common name of a highly classified United States Air Force facility located within Nevada. 

Former Area 51 employee and CIA specialist, TD Barnes joins Chrissy to speak about his experiences working on the A-12 stealth plane, his thoughts on Bob Lazar, his knowledge of the SR-71, what it was like spending time on the base, how he was scouted by the CIA and rumors of the SR-72 being built.

 

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      chelsey.n.ballarte@nasa.gov
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      Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
      626-808-2469
      calla.e.cofield@jpl.nasa.gov
      2024-085
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      Calla Cofield
      Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
      626-808-2469
      calla.e.cofield@jpl.nasa.gov
      2024-081
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