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US Navy Chief Yeoman saw secret documents of retrieved alien bodies dead and ALIVE!


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On Thanksgiving night, 1976, Thomas Colman Sheppard and two other Navy men saw photographs and documents in a TOP SECRET/MAJIC file about extraterrestrial biological entities. The location was a classified vault at White Beach Naval Facility in Okinawa, Japan. 

ufo%2Balien%2Bbiological%2Bentities.jpg

Linda Moulton Howe presents her exclusive interview with retired US Navy Chief Yeoman Sheppard referencing an aerial disc technology described by government documents as "interplanetary;" military attacks and disc retaliations; and the strict American policy of denial about the disc intelligences in the interest of national security. 

He also described seeing some highly classified “Roswell file photographs” of crashed UFOs and retrieved alien bodies — dead and alive.

 

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