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High speed UFO-Fastwalker passes close to a drone in straight path


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On August 8, 2021 a drone owner in the city of Vera Cruz, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil captured a high speed object at the moment the object passes close to the drone in straight path.

ufo%2Bfastwalker%2BVera%2BCruz%252C%2BRio%2BGrande%2Bdo%2BSul%252C%2BBrazil.jpg

The drone owner wonders whether the object was a small airplane, another drone, a bird or eventually something else. 

After analyzing the object with other similar objects moving through the sky at very high speed, it looks like it is a so-called UFO "fastwalker".

 “Fastwalker” is a term used by NORAD and branches of armed forces to describe unidentified aerial phenomena moving and/or changing directions at high speed far beyond what current aerospace technology is capable of.

 

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