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What are these bright objects in the sky


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Bright shining object flying over Crediton, UK. 

Witness captured an unknown object that moved smoothly and steadily. There were no visible wings or other directional or control surfaces; no vapor trails or sound. 

ufo%2Bbright%2Bobject%2Bsky.jpg

Bright shining object flying over Santa Clara, California. 

Witness while traveling near Santa Clara captured an unknown object flying very swiftly until it could not be seen anymore. source: www.mufon.com

 

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