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    • By NASA
      NASA astronauts Suni Williams (pictured left) and Butch Wilmore (pictured right) launched at 10:52 a.m. EDT June 5 as the first crewed flight of Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft on the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida.Credits: NASA Following their safe arrival at the International Space Station, NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams will participate in a pair of Earth to space calls Monday, June 10, regarding their historic mission aboard Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft:
      Known as NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test, the duo will speak first at 1 p.m. EDT with NASA Administrator Bill Nelson, Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy, Associate Administrator Jim Free, and Johnson Space Center Director Vanessa Wyche.
      Coverage of the call will stream live on NASA+, NASA Television, and the agency’s website. Learn how to stream NASA TV through a variety of platforms including social media.
      At 2:40 p.m., the astronauts will participate in a Q&A moderated by Chirag Parikh, deputy assistant to President Joe Biden and executive secretary for the White House’s National Space Council.
      Coverage of the call will stream live on NASA+, NASA Television, and the agency’s website.
      Wilmore and Williams launched at 10:52 a.m. June 5, on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida for NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test mission. They docked to the orbiting laboratory at 1:34 p.m., June 6, and will remain for a week-long stay, testing Starliner and its subsystems as the next step in the spacecraft’s certification for rotational missions as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program.
      NASA’s Commercial Crew Program is delivering on its goal of safe, reliable, and cost-effective transportation to and from the International Space Station from the United States through a partnership with American private industry. This partnership is opening access to low-Earth orbit and the International Space Station to more people, science, and commercial opportunities. The space station remains the springboard to NASA’s next great leap in space exploration, including future missions to the Moon under Artemis, and ultimately, to Mars.
      For more information about the mission, visit:
      www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew
      -end-
      Faith McKie / Josh Finch
      Headquarters, Washington
      202-358-1100
      faith.d.mckie@nasa.gov / joshua.a.finch@nasa.gov
      Share
      Details
      Last Updated Jun 07, 2024 LocationNASA Headquarters Related Terms
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    • By NASA
      5 min read
      Preparations for Next Moonwalk Simulations Underway (and Underwater)
      House Representative Statements
      The following are some of the statements made by Representatives regarding the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia.
      February 1, 2003: Representative Sherwood Boehlert
      PRESS RELEASE
      Date Released: Saturday, February 01, 2003
      House Science Committee
      Boehlert Statement on Space Shuttle Columbia Tragedy
      WASHINGTON, D.C. —House Science Committee Chairman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY) today released the following statement on the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy:
       “We are in a period of national mourning.  Our prayers are dedicated to the heroic crew of the Columbia and their families.  We are reminded again that our nation’s astronauts volunteer to put themselves in situations of inherent risk and that we take their efforts too much for granted. 
      “At the same time, in the wake of this horrible event, NASA and the Congress must work together immediately to initiate the most complete and thorough investigation possible in search of all the facts.”
      February 1, 2003: Representative Dana Rohrabacher
      PRESS RELEASE
      Date Released: Saturday, February 01, 2003
      Rep. Rohrabacher
      Rohrabacher Reacts to Loss of Space Shuttle Columbia
      WASHINGTON, D.C.—Representative Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA) mourns the loss of Columbia’s crew. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families of the Columbia Space Shuttle crew. This is a horrific loss for the nation as well as the world, but we should not forget the ultimate sacrifice sometime space exploration requires of men and women who are dedicated to pushing the boundaries. We must not lose sight of the fact that our continued drive to the stars serves as a tribute to those who make that sacrifice in the name of humanity. 
      Earlier today, NASA officials reported that the families of Columbia’s crew’s have a simple request of our space program: find out what happened, fix it, and move on. No one could say it any better. Now is the time for the Administration and Congress to support the efforts of Sean O’Keefe and the good people of NASA to investigate the events that led up to today’s tragedy. 
      Once the problem is identified, we need to get moving on this great adventure as quickly as possible. We must continue to find new ways to improving our space program by discovering new innovative technologies. We must do this for our nation, our children, and for the families of Columbia’s crew.
      February 2, 2003: Representative Dave Weldon
      PRESS RELEASE
      Date Released: Sunday, February 02, 2003
      Rep. Dave Weldon
      Rep. Weldon Statement on the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident
      Kennedy Space Center, FL —U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon (FL-15) released the following statement in the wake of the Space Shuttle Columbia accident.
      I mourn the loss of 7 brave men and women today. These dedicated pioneers — Commander -Rick Husband, Pilot-William McCool, Payload Commander – Michael Anderson, Specialist – Kalpana Chawla, Specialist – David Brown, Specialist – Laurel Clark and Specialist – Ilan Ramon — gave their lives in the name of science and exploration. This is a tragic day for America, for Israel, and for the world and we will forever be in their debt.
      While we must learn the cause of this tragedy, and I know NASA will be working diligently to do so, we must not let this deter our exploration efforts. We should never retreat from our progress in space exploration.
      We will reevaluate, however, how we conduct our human space flight operations, we will reexamine our processes, and we will learn how to make space flight safer. Then we will return to space. I believe the crew of Columbia would expect nothing less.
      “I would ask all Americans, and, indeed, everyone around the world, to keep the families, friends, and colleagues of these heroic astronauts in your thoughts and prayers. Their contribution to opening the frontier will not be forgotten,” said Rep. Weldon.
      House Committee on Science Hearings
      The following are some of the hearing charters, hearing transcripts, and opening statements for some of the various House Committee on Science hearings regarding Columbia.
      February 12, 2003
      House Committee on Science Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics and Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation—Joint Hearing on Space Shuttle Columbia
      This information was originally located on the House Committee on Science Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics, 108th Congress – 1st Session Web site and on the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation’s website.
      Hearing Charter Hearing Transcript Senator McCain’s Opening Statement Representative Boehlert’s Opening Statement Representative Rohrabacher’s Opening Statement NASA Administrator O’Keefe’s Opening Statement February 27, 2003
      Full Committee Hearing on NASA’s FY 2004 Budget Request
      This information was originally located on the House Committee on Science Full Committee Hearing 108th Congress – 1st Session website.
      Hearing Charter Representative Boehlert’s Opening Statement Representative Hall’s Opening Statement NASA Administrator O’Keefe’s Opening Statement September 4, 2003
      Full Committee Hearing on The Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report
      This information was originally located on the House Committee on Science Full Committee Hearing 108th Congress – 1st Session website.
      Hearing Charter Excerpts from the CAIB Report Executive Summary Representative Boehlert’s Opening Statement NASA Administrator O’Keefe’s Opening Statement September 10, 2023
      Full Committee Hearing on NASA’s Response to the Columbia Report
      This information was originally located on the House Committee on Science Full Committee Hearing 108th Congress – 1st Session website.
      Hearing Charter Representative Boehlert’s Opening Statement NASA Administrator O’Keefe’s Opening Statement
      October 29, 2003
      Full Committee Hearing on NASA’s Organizational and Management Challenges in the Wake of the Columbia Disaster
      This information was originally located on the House Committee on Science Full Committee Hearing 108th Congress – 1st Session website.
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    • By Space Force
      Bentivegna emphasized the importance of Guardians, Airmen and civilians understanding their roles in the Space Force and the critical role they play in Reoptimization for Great Power Competition.

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    • By Space Force
      Department of the Air Force senior leaders testified before the House Armed Services Committee Quality of Life Panel on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

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    • By NASA
      June 5, 2015 – NASA has issued a Record of Decision (ROD) adopting the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Office of Commercial Space Transportation Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Spaceport America Commercial Launch Site.
      Click here for the NASA ROD
      May 4, 2015 – NASA has issued a FONSI adopting the FAA EA for the Launch & Reentry of SpaceShipTwo Resusable Suborbital Rockets at the Mojave Air & Space Port, published in May 2012. 
      Click here for the NASA FONSI
      Click here for FAA’s FEA & FONSI 
      To return to the NEPA homepage, click here.
      Last Updated: Aug 4, 2017
      Editor: Samuel Serafini
      View the full article
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