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The Cast of Broadway’s ‘The Wiz’ “Ease on Down the Road” to Visit NASA Ames


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Preparations for Next Moonwalk Simulations Underway (and Underwater)

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Members of the cast and crew of “The Wiz” pose inside the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley.
NASA\Brandon Torres

Members of the cast and crew of Broadway production “The Wiz,” currently on tour at San Francisco’s Golden Gate Theatre, visited NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley on Jan. 29 to learn more about the center’s work in air and space.

The group met with center leadership and members of Ames employee advisory groups and toured the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS), the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC), and observed progress on the Automated Reconfigurable Mission Adaptive Digital Assembly Systems (ARMADAS) robots, which use pre-fabricated modular blocks to build structures autonomously, before following the yellow brick road back “home” to Oz. 

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Jan 29, 2024

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