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Kennedy Honors Fallen During Day of Remembrance


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Family members of fallen astronauts Kathie Scobee Fulgham, Lowell Grissom, Sheryl Chaffee, and Karen Bassett Stevenson place a wreath at the Space Mirror Memorial at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida on Thursday, Jan. 25, 2024, during the agency’s Day of Remembrance.

Family members of fallen astronauts Kathie Scobee Fulgham, Lowell Grissom, Sheryl Chaffee, and Karen Bassett Stevenson place a wreath at the Space Mirror Memorial at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida on Thursday, Jan. 25, 2024, during the agency’s Day of Remembrance. The annual tradition pays tribute to fallen astronauts and astronaut candidates who lost their lives while furthering the cause of exploration and discovery, including the crews of Apollo 1, Challenger STS-51L, and Columbia STS-107.

Burt Summerfield, associate director, management, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, spoke during the annual Day of Remembrance to honor fallen astronauts and astronaut candidates. “Today is an important day for NASA and the nation to recognize the contribution and sacrifice made in pursuit of space exploration and discovery for all.” Summerfield said. “As we push forward to the Moon and continue our missions to the International Space Station, it’s vital that we always remember and implement the lessons from the past in our preparations.”

View additional photos of the Day of Remembrance here.

Image Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

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