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NASA’s DC-8 to Fly Low-Altitude Over Central Valley, CA


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Preparations for Next Moonwalk Simulations Underway (and Underwater)

The DC-8 aircraft, seen from below against a cloudless blue sky, in flight.
DC-8 lifts off from Air Force Plant 42 in Palmdale, Calif.
NASA/Carla Thomas

What: NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s DC-8 aircraft will fly over Central Valley and surroundings areas as part of an air quality field study. Residents in the areas below will see and hear the aircraft as it flies to achieve these measurements.  

Where: Central Valley, CA and surrounding areas 

When: Tuesday, January 23, 2024 at mid-morning to early afternoon

Additional details: All flyovers are conducted at a safe altitude without harm to public, wildlife, or infrastructure.  Jet aircraft are loud and those with sensitivity to loud noises should be aware of the flyover window. 

To follow along real-time with the DC-8’s flight path, visit: 
https://airbornescience.nasa.gov/tracker/#!/status/list  

Learn more:  

-end- 

For more information contact: 

Erica Heim 
NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Edwards, California 
650-499-9053 
erica.heim@nasa.gov 

Elena Aguirre 
NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Edwards, California  
661-233-3966 
elena.aguirre@nasa.gov 

Megan Person 
NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Edwards, California 
661-276-2094 
megan.person@nasa.gov  

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Last Updated
Jan 23, 2024
Editor
Dede Dinius
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Erica Heim

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