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Mysterious Device Emits Light at Antarctica


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Searching for anomalies in Antarctica using Google Earth I found an unidentified device measuring 4 meters by 4 meters by 2 meters in height in a remote area near Rothschild Island in Antarctica. It appears that some form of energy is being released from the device leading to the observed emission of light. 

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A remarkable detail is that the device is placed directly in front of what appears to be two stone walls. 

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Rothschild Island is an island which is surrounded by mystery, with rumors suggesting covert operations occurring in the vicinity. Interestingly, Google Earth has blacked out the island by overlaying simulated snow. 

device%20light%20antarctica%20(3).png

I don't know what the object could be, but is it plausible that it serves as a power generator providing electricity to operate an unknown underground (alien) device or system in Antarctica, as it appears as if the device is placed above a large opening in the ice crust, and that this supposed power generator plays a role in an operation managed from the island?

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