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Axiom Mission 3 Launches to the International Space Station (Official NASA Broadcast)


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    • By NASA
      To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video
      Movie: Cal Poly Pomona/B. Binder; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss This graphic shows a three-dimensional map of stars near the Sun. These stars are close enough that they could be prime targets for direct imaging searches for planets using future telescopes. The blue haloes represent stars that have been observed with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and ESA’s XMM-Newton. The yellow star at the center of this diagram represents the position of the Sun. The concentric rings show distances of 5, 10, and 15 parsecs (one parsec is equivalent to roughly 3.2 light-years).
      Astronomers are using these X-ray data to determine how habitable exoplanets may be based on whether they receive lethal radiation from the stars they orbit, as described in our latest press release. This type of research will help guide observations with the next generation of telescopes aiming to make the first images of planets like Earth.
      Researchers examined stars that are close enough to Earth that telescopes set to begin operating in the next decade or two — including the Habitable Worlds Observatory in space and Extremely Large Telescopes on the ground — could take images of planets in the stars’ so-called habitable zones. This term defines orbits where the planets could have liquid water on their surfaces.
      There are several factors influencing what could make a planet suitable for life as we know it. One of those factors is the amount of harmful X-rays and ultraviolet light they receive, which can damage or even strip away the planet’s atmosphere.
      Based on X-ray observations of some of these stars using data from Chandra and XMM-Newton, the research team examined which stars could have hospitable conditions on orbiting planets for life to form and prosper. They studied how bright the stars are in X-rays, how energetic the X-rays are, and how much and how quickly they change in X-ray output, for example, due to flares. Brighter and more energetic X-rays can cause more damage to the atmospheres of orbiting planets.
      The researchers used almost 10 days of Chandra observations and about 26 days of XMM observations, available in archives, to examine the X-ray behavior of 57 nearby stars, some of them with known planets. Most of these are giant planets like Jupiter, Saturn or Neptune, while only a handful of planets or planet candidates could be less than about twice as massive as Earth.
      These results were presented at the 244th meeting of the American Astronomical Society meeting in Madison, Wisconsin, by Breanna Binder (California State Polytechnic University in Pomona).
      NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center manages the Chandra program. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory’s Chandra X-ray Center controls science from Cambridge, Massachusetts and flight operations from Burlington, Massachusetts.
      Read more from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory.
      For more Chandra images, multimedia and related materials, visit:
      https://www.nasa.gov/mission/chandra-x-ray-observatory/
      Visual Description:
      This video shows a three-dimensional map of stars near the Sun on the left side of our screen and a dramatic illustration of a star with a planet orbiting around it on the right side.
      The star map on the left shows many circular dots of different colors floating within an illustrated three-sided box. Each wall of the box is constructed in a grid pattern, with straight lines running horizontally and vertically like chicken wire. Dots that are colored blue represent stars that have been observed with NASA’s Chandra and ESA’s XMM-Newton.
      Suspended in the box, at about the halfway point, is a series of three concentric circles surrounding a central dot that indicates the placement of our Sun. The circles represent distances of 5, 10, and 15 parsecs. One parsec is equivalent to roughly 3.2 light-years.
      In the animation, the dot filled, chicken wire box spins around slowly, first on its X axis and then on its Y axis, providing a three-dimensional exploration of the plotted stars.
      News Media Contact
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      Chandra X-ray Center
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      Jonathan Deal
      Marshall Space Flight Center
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      View the full article
    • By NASA
      Researchers are diving into a synthetic universe to help us better understand the real one. Using supercomputers at the U.S. DOE’s (Department of Energy’s) Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, scientists have created nearly 4 million simulated images depicting the cosmos as NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope and the Vera C. Rubin Observatory, jointly funded by NSF (the National Science Foundation) and DOE, in Chile will see it.
      Michael Troxel, an associate professor of physics at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, led the simulation campaign as part of a broader project called OpenUniverse. The team is now releasing a 10-terabyte subset of this data, with the remaining 390 terabytes to follow this fall once they’ve been processed.
      “Using Argonne’s now-retired Theta machine, we accomplished in about nine days what would have taken around 300 years on your laptop,” said Katrin Heitmann, a cosmologist and deputy director of Argonne’s High Energy Physics division who managed the project’s supercomputer time. “The results will shape Roman and Rubin’s future attempts to illuminate dark matter and dark energy while offering other scientists a preview of the types of things they’ll be able to explore using data from the telescopes.”
      This graphic highlights part of a new simulation of what NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope could see when it launches by May 2027. The background spans about 0.11 square degrees (roughly equivalent to half of the area of sky covered by a full Moon), representing less than half the area Roman will see in a single snapshot. The inset zooms in to a region 300 times smaller, showcasing a swath of brilliant synthetic galaxies at Roman’s full resolution. Having such a realistic simulation helps scientists study the physics behind cosmic images –– both synthetic ones like these and future real ones. Researchers will use the observations for many types of science, including testing our understanding of the origin, evolution, and ultimate fate of the universe.C. Hirata and K. Cao (OSU) and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center A Cosmic Dress Rehearsal
      For the first time, this simulation factored in the telescopes’ instrument performance, making it the most accurate preview yet of the cosmos as Roman and Rubin will see it once they start observing. Rubin will begin operations in 2025, and NASA’s Roman will launch by May 2027.
      The simulation’s precision is important because scientists will comb through the observatories’ future data in search of tiny features that will help them unravel the biggest mysteries in cosmology.
      Roman and Rubin will both explore dark energy –– the mysterious force thought to be accelerating the universe’s expansion. Since it plays a major role in governing the cosmos, scientists are eager to learn more about it. Simulations like OpenUniverse help them understand signatures that each instrument imprints on the images and iron out data processing methods now so they can decipher future data correctly. Then scientists will be able to make big discoveries even from weak signals.
      “OpenUniverse lets us calibrate our expectations of what we can discover with these telescopes,” said Jim Chiang, a staff scientist at DOE’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California, who helped create the simulations. “It gives us a chance to exercise our processing pipelines, better understand our analysis codes, and accurately interpret the results so we can prepare to use the real data right away once it starts coming in.”
      Then they’ll continue using simulations to explore the physics and instrument effects that could reproduce what the observatories see in the universe.
      This photo displays Argonne Leadership Computing Facility’s now-retired Theta supercomputer. Scientists use supercomputers to simulate experiments they can’t conduct in real life, such as creating new universes from scratch. Argonne National Laboratory Telescopic Teamwork
      It took a large and talented team from several organizations to conduct such an immense simulation.
      “Few people in the world are skilled enough to run these simulations,” said Alina Kiessling, a research scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Southern California and the principal investigator of OpenUniverse. “This massive undertaking was only possible thanks to the collaboration between the DOE, Argonne, SLAC, and NASA, which pulled all the right resources and experts together.”
      And the project will ramp up further once Roman and Rubin begin observing the universe.
      “We’ll use the observations to make our simulations even more accurate,” Kiessling said. “This will give us greater insight into the evolution of the universe over time and help us better understand the cosmology that ultimately shaped the universe.”
      The Roman and Rubin simulations cover the same patch of the sky, totaling about 0.08 square degrees (roughly equivalent to a third of the area of sky covered by a full Moon). The full simulation to be released later this year will span 70 square degrees, about the sky area covered by 350 full Moons.
      Overlapping them lets scientists learn how to use the best aspects of each telescope –– Rubin’s broader view and Roman’s sharper, deeper vision. The combination will yield better constraints than researchers could glean from either observatory alone.
      “Connecting the simulations like we’ve done lets us make comparisons and see how Roman’s space-based survey will help improve data from Rubin’s ground-based one,” Heitmann said. “We can explore ways to tease out multiple objects that blend together in Rubin’s images and apply those corrections over its broader coverage.”
      This pair of images showcases the same region of sky as simulated by the Vera C. Rubin Observatory (left, processed by the Legacy Survey of Space and Time Dark Energy Science Collaboration) and NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope (right, processed by the Roman High-Latitude Imaging Survey Project Infrastructure Team). Roman will capture deeper and sharper images from space, while Rubin will observe a broader region of the sky from the ground. Because it has to peer through Earth’s atmosphere, Rubin’s images won’t always be sharp enough to distinguish multiple, close sources as separate objects. They’ll appear to blur together, which limits the science researchers can do using the images. But by comparing Rubin and Roman images of the same patch of sky, scientists can explore how to “deblend” objects and implement the adjustments across Rubin’s broader observations. J. Chiang (SLAC), C. Hirata (OSU), and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Scientists can consider modifying each telescope’s observing plans or data processing pipelines to benefit the combined use of both.
      “We made phenomenal strides in simplifying these pipelines and making them usable,” Kiessling said. A partnership with Caltech/IPAC’s IRSA (Infrared Science Archive) makes simulated data accessible now so when researchers access real data in the future, they’ll already be accustomed to the tools. “Now we want people to start working with the simulations to see what improvements we can make and prepare to use the future data as effectively as possible.”
      OpenUniverse, along with other simulation tools being developed by Roman’s Science Operations and Science Support centers, will prepare scientists for the large datasets expected from Roman. The project brings together dozens of experts from NASA’s JPL, DOE’s Argonne, IPAC, and several U.S. universities to coordinate with the Roman Project Infrastructure Teams, SLAC, and the Rubin LSST DESC (Legacy Survey of Space and Time Dark Energy Science Collaboration). The Theta supercomputer was operated by the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a DOE Office of Science user facility.
      The Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope is managed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, with participation by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Caltech/IPAC in Southern California, the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, and a science team comprising scientists from various research institutions. The primary industrial partners are BAE Systems, Inc. in Boulder, Colorado; L3Harris Technologies in Rochester, New York; and Teledyne Scientific & Imaging in Thousand Oaks, California.
      The Vera C. Rubin Observatory is a federal project jointly funded by the National Science Foundation and the DOE Office of Science, with early construction funding received from private donations through the LSST Discovery Alliance.
      Download high-resolution video and images from NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio
      By Ashley Balzer
      NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
      Media Contact:
      Claire Andreoli
      301-286-1940
      claire.andreoli@nasa.gov
      NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
      Explore More
      5 min read Millions of Galaxies Emerge in New Simulated Images From NASA’s Roman
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      Article 7 months ago Share
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      Last Updated Jun 12, 2024 Related Terms
      Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope Astrophysics Dark Energy Dark Matter Galaxies, Stars, & Black Holes Galaxies, Stars, & Black Holes Research Goddard Space Flight Center High-Tech Computing Missions Science & Research Science-enabling Technology Stars Technology Technology Research The Universe 6 Min Read NASA’s Roman Mission Gets Cosmic ‘Sneak Peek’ From Supercomputers
      This synthetic image is a slice of a much larger simulation depicting the cosmos as NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will see it when it launches by May 2027. Every blob and speck of light represents a distant galaxy (except for the urchin-like spiky dots, which represent foreground stars in our Milky Way galaxy). Credits: C. Hirata and K. Cao (OSU) and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center View the full article
    • By NASA
      2 min read
      Preparations for Next Moonwalk Simulations Underway (and Underwater)
      Brad Flick, center director at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, talks to students from California State University, Northridge, California. As part of the university’s Autonomy Research Center for science, technology, engineering, entrepreneurship, arts, humanities, and mathematics, the students displayed posters and answered questions about their technologies May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium on Edwards Air Force Base, California.NASA/Steve Freeman Students from a minority-serving university in California are helping solve challenges of autonomous systems for future drone operations on Earth and other planets. These students are making the most of opportunities with NASA, the U.S. Department of Defense, and industry, focusing on autopilot development and advanced systems that adapt and evolve.
      Students from California State University, Northridge, who are part of the university’s Autonomy Research Center, displayed and discussed their research with posters highlighting the technology they developed at a recent event at Edwards Air Force Base in Edwards, California. A Mars science helicopter, mini rovers for science exploration, and 3D printed sulfur concrete for Mars habitats are some of their projects, and they answered questions from experts in the field on May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium.
      Two men from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, ask Jared Carrillo, a student from the California State University, Northridge, Autonomy Research Center for science, technology, engineering, entrepreneurship, arts, humanities, and mathematics, about his work on the Mars Science Helicopter. Students displayed posters and answered questions about their technologies May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium on Edwards Air Force Base, California.NASA/Steve Freeman “The goal is to help minority-serving institutions develop relationships with NASA,” said Bruce Cogan, a NASA Armstrong Small Business Innovation Research program liaison for the agency’s Aeronautics Research and Mission Directorate. “We want students to make connections and learn how to use NASA processes to submit research proposals. Students could also supplement work in autonomy that NASA wants to pursue.”
      Representatives from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, attended the event, looking for potential collaborations with students where NASA Armstrong would provide the funding through sources such as the NASA Armstrong Center Innovation Fund and NASA’s Convergent Aeronautics Solutions project to advance technology.
      Six students from the California State University, Northridge, Autonomy Research Center for science, technology, engineering, entrepreneurship, arts, humanities, and mathematics spoke about their Trust in Autonomy technology. The students from left are Aniket Christi, Julia Spencer, Dana Bellinger, Zulma Lopez Rodriguez, front, Jordan Jannone, and Samuel Mercado. The group answered questions about their technology May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium on Edwards Air Force Base, California.NASA/Steve Freeman Use of uncrewed systems will require development of advanced controllers, and ideas like trust in autonomy, or how people can trust what the computers are doing, and human-machine teaming on Mars and Europa missions are examples of potential partnerships, Cogan said.
      Brad Flick, NASA Armstrong center director, and Tim Cacanindin, U.S. Air Force Global Power Bombers Combined Test Force deputy director, spoke at the event. Following the event, more than 50 students and faculty toured NASA Armstrong facilities.
      NASA’s Minority University Research and Education Project Institutional Research Opportunity funds a multi-year grant for the Autonomy Research Center. NASA Armstrong, and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, co-sponsored the NASA grant.
      Nhut Ho, director of the NASA-sponsored Autonomy Research Center for science, technology, engineering, entrepreneurship, arts, humanities, and mathematics at California State University, Northridge, left, spoke to Brad Flick, center director at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. The men were attending a student poster event, where students showcased their technologies and answered questions May 23 at the Air Force Test Pilot School auditorium on Edwards Air Force Base, California.NASA/Steve Freeman Share
      Details
      Last Updated Jun 10, 2024 EditorDede DiniusContactJay Levinejay.levine-1@nasa.govLocationArmstrong Flight Research Center Related Terms
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    • By European Space Agency
      Europe’s newest rocket soon launches, taking with it many space missions each with a unique objective, destination and team at home, cheering them on. Whether launching new satellites to look back and study Earth, peer out to deep space or test important new technologies in orbit, Ariane 6’s first flight will showcase the versatility and flexibility of this impressive, heavy-lift launcher. Read on for all about the RAMI deployer, then see who else is flying first.
      View the full article
    • By European Space Agency
      A new collaboration between ESA and Schiphol Airport in the Netherlands has got passengers thinking about space. Digital screens throughout the airport featuring stunning  satellite images of Earth have been stopping travellers in their tracks. That's because these pictures from space are part of a fun Where on Earth? travel quiz.
      View the full article
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