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Deputy Program Manager Dr. Camille Alleyne


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“I started the Brightest Stars Foundation 16 years ago because I realized there were no little ones in the pipeline who looked like me coming up. Because I had accomplished so much, it was important for me to pay it forward. I’ve mentored scores and scores of young people – early career professionals in high school, in college, and from all over the world – so they could be inspired and empowered by my career and my journey.

“It’s about hard work. It’s about determination. It’s about focus. It’s about tenacity. And most importantly, it’s about believing in yourself. Because sometimes others don’t believe in you, so it’s important to get into the zone and say, ‘I am going! I know my path, and I can do this!’ 

“My mentoring style is about being authentic but also being vulnerable and sharing all the ups and the downs, the trials and the tribulations of my journey and career. This is not an easy field, so as one of the few womenof color in the field, it is important to share in a way that empowers and inspires those that want to follow in my footsteps.  


“You must have grit, resilience, courage and strength. I’m able to really share all the wisdom and the lessons I’ve learned throughout my career with [the students I mentor], and that makes a difference.”

—  Dr. Camille Alleyne, Deputy Program Manager, Commercial LEO Development Program, NASA’s Johnson Space Center

Image Credit: NASA / Kim Shiflett
Interviewer: NASA / Thalia Patrinos

Check out some of our other Faces of NASA. 

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