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Preflight Checks for Astronaut Loral O’Hara


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Astronaut Loral O'Hara looks upward while in a reclined position. Her feet are out of focus in the foreground. Her hand rests on the blue rim of her helmet. She wears a white and blue spacesuit.
NASA/Bill Ingalls

Expedition 70 NASA astronaut Loral O’Hara has her Russian Sokol Suit pressure checked ahead of launching to the International Space Station on Sept. 15, 2023. O’Hara, currently on the station, is scheduled to spend six months there. She and her fellow Expedition 70 crew members are studying an array of microgravity phenomena to benefit humans living on and off the Earth, as well as exploring heart health, cancer treatments, space manufacturing techniques, and more during their long-duration stay in Earth orbit.

The NASA Headquarters photographers chose this photo as one of the best images from 2023. See the rest on Flickr.

Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

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