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NASA’s Agency Chief Technologist presents their first annual year-in-review for 2023


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Preparations for Next Moonwalk Simulations Underway (and Underwater)

A Year in Review 2023 from NASA’s Agency Chief Technologist.

OTPS shares an annual letter from the Agency Chief Technologist (ACT), updates on various studies in the technology domain within OTPS, overviews of the center chief technologists, and vignettes of various technology projects across the agency. Read the full report, A Year in Review 2023 from NASA’s Agency Chief Technologist.

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Last Updated
Dec 27, 2023
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Bill Keeter

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      256-544-0034  
      jonathan.e.deal@nasa.gov 
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