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Site-Wide Environmental Assessment for Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama


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Preparations for Next Moonwalk Simulations Underway (and Underwater)

Notice of Availability. The Draft Site-Wide Environmental Assessment (EA) for Marshall Space Flight Center is complete and NASA determined the project will not result in significant environmental impacts. Therefore, a Draft Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) has been prepared. Both documents are available for public review and comment for the next thirty (30) days.

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Last Updated
Dec 19, 2023
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MSFC Environmental Engineering and Occupational Health Office
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Hannah McCarty

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Details

Last Updated
Dec 19, 2023
Editor
MSFC Environmental Engineering and Occupational Health Office
Contact
Hannah McCarty

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