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2023 in Review: Artemis II Crew Visits Kennedy


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Four astronauts wearing blue flight suits stand inside a building, with the Orion crew module behind them. They are, from left, Jeremy Hansen, Victor Glover, Reid Wiseman, and Christina Koch. Glover is a Black man, and Koch is a White woman. Orion is cone-shaped, with a flat top. It is black and has yellow wiring on it, as well as blue dots around some panels.
NASA / Kim Shiflett

On Aug. 8, 2023, Artemis II crew members (from left) Jeremy Hansen, Victor Glover, Reid Wiseman, and Christina Koch took a photo in front of their Orion crew module at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Announcing the crew and continuing work on the Space Launch System rocket and Orion are part of the significant steps taken this year toward the agency’s goal of landing the first woman and first person of color on the Moon.

Look back on NASA’s achievements in 2023.

Image Credit: NASA

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