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Whistleblower: Controlled disclosure campaign 'Total Failure'


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A recent summer hearing featured David Grusch, a former intelligence officer and whistleblower, who asserted that the government was withholding information, including evidence of "non-human biologics" retrieved from UFOs is determined to continue to get the truth out as he is admonishing Congress for what he says is a "total failure" to get more transparency about what the government knows about unidentified aerial phenomena. 

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Lawmakers took a step toward transparency by including in the annual defense funding bill a provision requiring disclosure of classified records relating to UAPs, but not before stripping out key portions of the measure. 

Among them was a provision that aimed to establish an advisory board responsible for overseeing the disclosure of records. Unfortunately, this initiative is now postponed, as Grusch lamented, marking the failure of what was referred to as the "controlled disclosure campaign." 

The apparent reason for the campaign's shortcomings is twofold. Firstly, influential individuals in positions of power with vested interests may adamantly refuse to disclose their knowledge, fearing potential consequences and the loss of accumulated power derived from years of concealing the UFO secret. Additionally, certain senators are impeding the disclosure process due to financial contributions from the military-industrial complex and defense contractors. 

In essence, this situation not only raises concerns about the true extent of government transparency but also strongly suggests a significant cover-up. 

The argument is clear: if there is nothing to hide, transparency and disclosure should pose no problem.

 

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