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Climate tipping points in Earth’s climate system

As the planet warms, many parts of the Earth system are undergoing large-scale changes. Ice sheets are shrinking, sea levels are rising and coral reefs are dying off.

While climate records are being continuously broken, the cumulative impact of these changes could also cause fundamental parts of the Earth system to change dramatically. These ‘tipping points’ of climate change are critical thresholds in that, if exceeded, can lead to irreversible consequences.  

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      Hubble Pointing and Control


      Operating Hubble with Only One Gyroscope


      Hubble Science Highlights


      Hubble Images

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