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Dragon Lights Up the Night


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SpaceX's Cargo Dragon launches from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida in its 29th commercial resupply mission. The rocket's engines are glowing brightly as it takes off through the dark night sky, and the light illuminates the water below.

In this photo from Nov. 9, 2023, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket illuminates the water as it launches at night from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 29th commercial resupply mission of the Cargo Dragon spacecraft brought new scientific research, technology demonstrations, crew supplies, and hardware to the International Space Station, including NASA’s Integrated Laser Communications Relay Demonstration Low Earth Orbit User Modem and Amplifier Terminal (ILLUMA-T) and Atmospheric Waves Experiment (AWE).

Image Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

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