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From the Philippines to the U.S. Air Force and Space Force: How one service members unique upbringing forged a path dedicated to military service


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For Enterprise Talent Management Office Senior Enlisted Leader Chief Master Sgt. Swani Caraballo, military service runs in the family. However, her legacy is not forged from the traditional “military brat” paradigm. In fact, her father served in the German army, and her maternal grandfather wore the uniform for his home nation of the Philippines. While both of these influences indeed shaped her military destiny, it was actually a poignant experience as a young girl that solidified her desire to join the Air Force.
From the Philippines to the U.S. Air Force and Space Force: How one service members unique upbringing forged a path dedicated to military service

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