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Newest Astronaut Candidate Class Visits NASA’s Glenn Research Center


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Newest Astronaut Candidate Class Visits NASA’s Glenn Research Center

Members of NASA’s 2021 astronaut candidate class visited NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland on Oct. 5 and 6 to learn more about the scope of work at the center. NASA Glenn’s world-class facilities and expertise in power, propulsion, and communications are crucial to advancing the agency’s Artemis program.   

Alt Text: Dr. Rickey Shyne stands in front of a large monitor while Astronaut Candidates sit around a table and look ahead.
Dr. Rickey Shyne, NASA Glenn Research Center’s director of Research and Technology, briefs astronaut candidates on Glenn’s core competencies.
Credit: NASA/Jef Janis

The astronaut candidates, accompanied by Shannon Walker, deputy chief of the Astronaut Office, toured several facilities at both NASA Glenn campuses – Lewis Field in Cleveland and Neil Armstrong Test Facility in Sandusky, Ohio. Some of the key facilities included the Electric Propulsion and Power Laboratory, Aerospace Communications Facility, NASA Electric Aircraft Testbed, and Space Environments Complex.  

During a tour in the Exercise Countermeasures Lab, NASA Glenn Research Center’s Kelly Gilkey, right, discusses the features of a harness prototype being tested for exercising in space.
During a tour in the Exercise Countermeasures Lab, NASA Glenn Research Center’s Kelly Gilkey, right, discusses the features of a harness prototype being tested for exercising in space.
Credit: NASA/Jef Janis

The visit integrated briefings with senior leadership and opportunities to interact with staff, including early-career employees. 

Alt Text: A group of Astronaut Candidates and NASA staff gather around a screened-in top of the vacuum chamber in the Zero Gravity Research Facility.
Astronaut candidates and NASA Glenn Research Center staff stand at the top of the Zero Gravity Research Facility’s drop tower. 
Credit: NASA/Jef Janis

As part of their rigorous two-year training, these future explorers are visiting each NASA center and learning how to prepare for NASA’s missions of tomorrow. 

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