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Earth from Space: Southern Patagonian Ice Field


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      (Nov. 8, 2021) — The International Space Station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour during a fly around of the orbiting lab that took place following its undocking from the Harmony module’s space-facing port on Nov. 8, 2021.NASA/SpaceX NASA is celebrating the 25th anniversary of International Space Station operations during a live conversation with crew aboard the microgravity laboratory for the benefit of humanity. During a space-to-Earth call at 12:25 p.m. EST Wednesday, Dec. 6, the Expedition 70 crew will speak with NASA Associate Administrator Bob Cabana and Joel Montalbano, space station program manager.
      Watch on the NASA+ streaming service at no cost on demand. The discussion also will air live on NASA Television, the NASA app, YouTube, and the agency’s website. Learn how to stream NASA TV through a variety of platforms including social media.
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      Through this global endeavor, astronauts have continuously lived and worked aboard the space station for more than 23 years, testing technologies, performing science, and developing the skills needed to explore farther from Earth. It has been visited by 273 people from 21 countries.
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      Learn more about the International Space Station at:
      https://www.nasa.gov/station
      -end-
      Josh Finch
      Headquarters, Washington
      202-358-1100
      joshua.a.finch@nasa.gov
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      Last Updated Dec 05, 2023 LocationNASA Headquarters Related Terms
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    • By NASA
      Students participate in the 21st annual Disability Mentoring Day on Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2023, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The visiting students paired with mentors from Kennedy based on interests spanning from public affairs to engineering, shadowing them to learn about their respective day-to-day duties at the spaceport. Mentors shared experiences and insight on their path to NASA and provided learning opportunities to students looking to kickstart their career development.NASA/Glenn Benson By Matina Douzenis
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      1 min read
      Artificial Intelligence Plus Your Cell Phone Means Better Maps of Earth!
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      Grab your smartphone and join the project!
      Facebook logo @DoNASAScience @DoNASAScience Share








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      Last Updated Dec 04, 2023 Related Terms
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